nutrition_label

Friday Link Love: You Can Change the Future of Food

comments

Food for Thought

If you care about food and nutrition, you’ve got a chance to make a difference! About a month ago, the USDA revealed a new plate to replace the outdated Food Pyramid. (If you missed this news, you can check it out at: choosemyplate.gov) The plate is far more intuitive than the pyramid–it gives you a concrete visual guideline for how to fill up your plate.

The UC Berkeley School of Journalism and Good Magazine is taking change a step further by launching a contest to create a new food label, which hasn’t been updated in 20 years. Their objective? “Inspire better food and nutrition literacy with clear, simple, easy-to-understand labels.” The panel of judges is an eclectic mix of experts that includes the maestro of food awareness himself, Michael Pollan and Laura Brunow Miner, designer and founder of Pictory, the funky online photo documentary magazine.

Even if you don’t plan on submitting a design, the web site is worth checking out – it includes interviews with each judge who all have a slightly different take on what’s wrong with the current food label. For example, Pollan talks about how the degree to which a food is processed is missing from the label, whereas Robert Lustig M.D. feels like labels don’t give us a full picture about how much added sugar is in our food. (BTW, you can see our nutritionist’s take on how to read current food labels here.)

Rethink the food label from News21 Berkeley 2011 on Vimeo.

Submissions must be received by July 1st – so put your pen to paper and spread the word!

Bionic Pup

Meet Naki’o. A dog whose tragic tale has a happy ending. Naki’o lost all four of his paws to frostbite and was resigned to crawling around on his belly. Fortunately the organization OrthoPets provided Naki’o with four bionic legs and now he can run and play just like any other pup.

I found this video earlier this week on HuffPo and watched it about 15 times. Now
USA Today provides the whole backstory. There’s nothing more heartwarming than a happy, healthy dog, right?

Don’t Be a Slouch

The New York Times’ Health Consumer column this week talks about the importance of sitting up straight for the health of your back. As obvious as this is, most of us find it challenging to maintain, as evidenced by the statistic they provide: Nearly 80% of Americans will experience back pain in their lifetime.

I like the article because it provides helpful, concrete ideas for improving your posture and they align with all of the advice we’ve got on our blog. One such idea is to take frequent breaks throughout your workday and incorporate stretches since, “Sitting for long periods puts pressure on discs and fatigues muscles.” Read their story for more ideas and check out some stretches from One Medical osteopath, Carrie Bowler under our Related Links below.

Comments