11 Surprising Things That Put You at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

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Diabetes comes in two forms. In type 1 diabetes, which is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone needed to convert food into energy. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces plenty of insulin, but the body develops resistance to its own insulin. type 2 diabetes is most common in adults, but it is now being diagnosed in many children as well.

These two types of diabetes overlap in their clinical manifestations, but they are actually different diseases with different causes and treatments. Here’s a look at some of the lesser-known factors that can increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

1. Genes

The development of diabetes involves a complex mix of lifestyle factors, environmental factors, and genetics. The risk of developing diabetes is higher if you are closely related to someone who has the disease. If anyone in your immediate family has diabetes, your risk is increased two to three times, and even higher if you have more than one affected first-degree relative.

2. Ethnicity

Studies have identified certain populations that, all other things being equal, have an increased risk of developing diabetes. Among those populations in the US are Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans.

3. Gender

Adolescent girls are more at risk than adolescent boys, possibly because of the insulin resistance that accompanies polycystic ovary syndrome, a common hormonal problem in women.

4. Fat Distribution

If you are overweight, your risk of developing diabetes is in part determined by where you put those extra pounds. There is a greater risk associated with central or abdominal fat than with fat in the buttocks and thighs—the latter is more common in women than men. However, there is nothing you can do to change where your body deposits fat. Spot reduction is a myth.

5. Dietary Habits

Consuming a lot of red (especially processed) meat and sugar-sweetened drinks is a major risk factor. On the other hand, eating a diet high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and olive oil lowers your risk. Low-fat dairy products also appear to lower the risk of diabetes.

6. Coffee Consumption

Good news for you coffee drinkers — there’s evidence of a decreased risk of diabetes associated with drinking coffee. Green tea appears to have a similar protective effect.

7. Sedentary Lifestyle

No surprise here — leading a sedentary lifestyle increases your diabetes risk. If you want to lower your chance of developing diabetes, you have to get moving. At the very least, don’t watch too much television — of all sedentary activities, TV watching has been the one factor that seems to carry the most consistent risk.

8. Smoking

The risks of cancer and cardiovascular disease get most of the attention when it comes to the ill effects of smoking, but several studies have also confirmed a link between cigarette smoking and diabetes.

9. Sleep Habits

There appears to be a connection between diabetes and sleeping too little—only five to six hours per night—and sleeping too much—more than eight to nine hours. Studies have also confirmed a link between obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes. If you’re having trouble sleeping, vist our sleep health center and talk to your provider for further advice.

10. Gestational Diabetes

Some women develop impaired sugar metabolism during pregnancy that goes away after delivery. But down the road, these women are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Evidence also suggests that the children of mothers with gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing diabetes later as well.

11. Obesity

This last risk factor shouldn’t come as a surprise, but the dramatic rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes is due in large part to the dramatic increase in obesity in our population. The connection between obesity and diabetes is even greater in children and adolescents than in adults, and because many of the most important repercussions of diabetes — heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage — develop only after years of having the illness, the epidemic in children is of special concern. The good news: Lose the weight, and in most cases, diabetes will go away as well.

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The One Medical blog is published by One Medical, an innovative primary care practice with offices in Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington, DC.

Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. The One Medical Group entities and 1Life Healthcare, Inc. make no representations or warranties and expressly disclaim any and all liability concerning any treatment, action by, or effect on any person following the general information offered or provided within or through the blog, website, or app. If you have specific concerns or a situation arises in which you require medical advice, you should consult with an appropriately trained and qualified medical services provider.

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